Progress on my goal

I seem to be completely unable to stop taking photos of my progress on the lush and lacy cardigan.  The ruffled peplum is like magic, the fabric is so soft, and everything is going so quickly!

I still have no idea what size this is going to be, but I’m pretty sure it will fit.  It’s difficult to measure, but halfway through the bust increases it seems to be about 16 inches across the back, which is just what I want!  I feel like I’ve barely worked on it, yet the back is halfway finished.  Angora and I, while not perhaps best friends, at least get along tolerably well.  I can’t knit on this for hours at a time without getting hairs in my eyes and nose, which does give a bit of allergy, but it does not cause the severe reaction that alpaca does.  And besides… I’ve always worn angora sweaters, so I know it can’t be that bad!

I also did some swatching yesterday, and finally started on my goal on making a crocheted sweater!  First I swatched Karabella Zodiac, for Short and sweet.

I got gauge easily on the recommended hook.  I like zodiac for its nice stitch definition, sheen, and pretty colors.  When knitted it makes a surprisingly nice, crisp fabric, and isn’t as stiff as you might expect it to be.  It is more splitty that I think a yarn should be, especially for crochet.  You can see that in the top of this swatch, but then again you can also see my secret shame… sometimes I don’t pick up both loops on the beginning chain, mostly if the yarn is especially splitty.  In this case the yarn was splitty, but I was also being lazy.  I won’t do this on the actual garment because it shows.  When spring arrives I will be glad to make this sweater again (I’m blocking out how difficult it was the first time!)

But short and sweet is too summery for late January, so I kept swatching.  I swatched several yarns for the Sanctuary Bolero from Sensual Crochet, finally getting something like gauge with Knitpicks Shine sport.  However, the only color I have enough of is Aquamarine, and while I like the color I am not sure.  Maybe it would be nice for spring?  Or maybe I would look like some kind of crazy easter egg… I have trouble distinguishing between the two with pastel colors.  hmm…

But all is not lost…

I have started a sweater.  This  is the comfy cardi from CrochetMe (the book.)  The yarn is baby cashmerino, bought on deep discount from LittleKnits.  Isn’t the color great?  I love the dark violet.  I had to go down to a 2.5 mm hook to get gauge, but it’s not overly stiff.  Unlike knitting needles (except at very small sizes) crochet hooks are not always the same size.  Clover hooks are consistently larger than their letter designation would indicate.  The stitch pattern is really fun and not especially hard at all!

Since I have put down my Diane sweater, I’m going to start swatching for these fingerless gloves in a little while, using Lousia Harding Grace (a super lovely wool/silk blend.)

They will be quick, and I need another pair for my teaching studio.

Still life of robot with doily

The robot is to distract you from the fact that I have cast on for another sweater.  It’s unlike me, I know!  I’m feeling profoundly ambivalent about the Louisa Harding sweater I am currently working on.  I think it will be lovely when it’s finished, but the yarn is painful to my hands in a way that only a synthetic can be – the yarn is mostly nylon I think, with a little mohair for texture.   I find that I’m completely avoiding working on it (thus the many quick FOs lately) because I don’t want to risk hurting myself.  So… I’m not saying it’s done, but I am saying that it needs to be alternated with something made of nice sproingy yarn.

Enter this: Valley Yarns Sheffield, a merino/silk/angora blend, being knitted into the Lush and Lacey cardigan from Sweaterbabe.  This color is called lake, and it’s maybe a smidge more green than it looks here.  It’s a lovely yarn, smooth and lofty with a nice angora halo.  It sheds, but not in the terribly clumpy way some angoras do.
 

Since Sheffield knits to a smaller gauge than Classic Elite Lush (I get 4.75 st/in on size 7 needles) I’m knitting a size medium in the hopes of achieving something like a 33-34″ bust.  The lace panel makes exact calculations a little difficult, but I think I’m close.  There are some gorgeous FOs of this sweater on Ravelry. I bought it months ago, but I’ve been waiting for the approach of spring to start, since the color is so fresh looking and it doesn’t have full length sleeves.  I can’t wait to make the cute little peplum ruffle!

We are going to have to take Leon to the vet tomorrow.  He was upset and hissing on Friday night (he has never hissed in my presence before) and he’s been avoiding the litter box…  he’s always been sort of picky about it, but right now he seems downright upset at the thing!  I think he might have a UTI.  He seems to be ok now, but I’m not taking any chances… he goes in ASAP. That cat is seriously my best friend, and I want to make sure he’s all right.  I am a worrier, but look at that face!

Leon likes it when I get packages.

And I have some yarn photos, because… well, I like taking photos of my yarn.

Karabella Zodiac for Short and Sweet.  I decided to go with the recommended yarn and save the Bernat soy for something knitted.  And yes, that is the color from the book, because I realized I would not be happy with anything else!

Berroco Naturlin, this is a brand new yarn!  It’s a blend of linen and rayon.  It has a lovely drape, and maintains the nice linen feel without feeling like twine.  I want to use this to make the tuxedo tank from last summer’s IK, or failing that a nice table runner.   I’m really curious to swatch with this and see how it works up.  I haven’t worked with much linen, but I think I could handle this amount.  The color (Cinnamon) is so wonderful!

O-wool Balance, 50% wool and 50% cotton in Lapis.  I bought this with no real purpose a while ago, but after seeing the Spring IK preview (and becoming obsessed with the flutter sleeved cardigan) I think this would be a great sub for the Classic Elite Classic silk called for in the pattern.   I made Ms. Marigold from classic silk, and it has a similar nubby appearance.  And check out the two perfect buttons!

We went to four(!) open houses today.  We are still considering the condo I mentioned this week, but I do worry about having my piano in a condo – I have had trouble with neighbors before, but I am going to be teaching from my home, which has much higher potential to be irritating to others.  Grand pianos… not really quiet.  Every.  So we’ve decided to keep that one in mind, but look for single family homes.  We saw some really lovely homes today, but nothing exactly what we want.  I am hopeful it is out there, because we are getting closer!

FO: Chanson en Crochet

Pattern: Chanson en Crochet from Wrap Style (available as a free download from Knitting Daily)

Yarn: Moda Dea Silk n Wool, 2.5 skeins in Wasabi

Hook: US J

Notes:  I spend most of my weekends playing piano or cantoring in a terribly unheated/over air conditioned Catholic church.  We’ve already discussed (and solved) my cold fingers problem.  Now we have to address the fact that the musicians are seated directly in front of the air vent, and I spend most of the spring/summer/fall freezing whenever I sing.   This is part of the reason for my cardigan obsession.  But sometimes… sometimes you want to wear a short sleeved/sleeveless dress, and you want to neither cover it totally up or freeze.  I love shawls, but they’re difficult to deal with when you need your arms.  A cute capelet with a button is a great solution to the problem!

This pattern apparently has a lot of errata, but if you download the PDF from knitting daily you will mind most of the errata corrected.  I say most, because I didn’t think it was clear you should end with a SC in the turning chain at the end of row 13.  The errata PDF says so, but not the corrected version, resulting in me ripping row 13 about 5 times.  The flowers are really cute, but they were an awful pain to actually make – I am not a fan of that many cluster stitches together!  The yarn was nice for crocheting – it isn’t tremendously soft, think about Cascade 220 level of softness… but it isn’t scratchy either, and when blocked it becomes nice and drapey.

The pattern worked up quickly – I would say this is around 6 hours of work, which really isn’t bad to have a new capelet!  It’s not wearable yet, but as soon as spring arrives I will be all set.  I love the way this turned out, and I’m so proud that I’ve picked up my hook again!

Updates

Today we looked at a house… well, we looked at a house (which I didn’t love)and then we looked at a condo that was larger than any of the houses we’ve seen so far.  I loved the condo.  We haven’t been looking at them because A. we needed more space and B. we didn’t want to disturb people with my piano.  But this is 2400 square feet, and it’s basically just a giant brick victorian mansion cut into two units, so we share very few walls, and besides… the thing is built to withstand nuclear war.  It’s absolutely nearly soundproof.  And gorgeous.  And across the street from a great inner city park!  Don’t want to get my hopes up, but… it’s the best we’ve seen so far.  We will see – cross your fingers for us!

Chanson en Crochet is nearing completion.  I think even the corrected pattern has a few issues, but I’ll talk about those in my FO post.  It needs blocking very badly, but I think you can see how lovely the flower pattern is (and oh my goodness… what a pain it was!)  Crochet is making me so happy lately!

The Diane cardigan is coming along- the back here is completed.  It isn’t blocked (I usually block my pieces right away) because I don’t want to block it until I attach the edgings.  I still quite like the fabric, but the yarn, due to being mostly nylon and having no stretch, is a little hard on my hands, so I’m proceeding somewhat slowly for me.

Honestly, I’m a little bored with it, but I think that’s because even more spring patterns are coming out, and in spite of the fact that it was 17 degrees when I left this morning I’m hoping for spring.  The new Interweave preview was up, but now it’s down, but no matter – I saved the ones I liked!

 

Does Interweave have my number or what?  I do love a little fluttery cardigan, I cannot help myself!  The designs are so feminine and so classic.  Lots of small gauge knits… yay, so happy with these!  I think Interweave is improving tremendously under Eunny Jang’s leadership.  While I always loved the magazine, sometimes it would have… dare I say it… a bit of frumpiness?   Sizing is improving too – the only one of these sweaters I might have to resize is the flutter sleeved cardigan (the 4th sweater) but since it’s a simple design that shouldn’t be hard.  I like the models this time – that redhead is gorgeous, and she has inspired me to knit the honeycomb sweater (3rd sweater) in the same colors!  I think the silk cardigan (6th photo) wins the “craziest yarn price” award, as it is knitted from Fiesta La Luz.  1500 yards for the smallest size.  Yeah… not so much.  But it’s so  lovely, and so exactly my style, that I will be on the lookout for a substitute yarn!

And yes, I will be knitting that camisole, no matter that I said no more knitted tanks – it’s so cute!  I’m imagining it in a nice chocolate brown… pretty!  Also breaking my rule, I’ve decided to knit the tuxedo tank from last summer’s IK (late to the party on that one.)   I had skipped it because I don’t care for Euroflax, and I also didn’t like the reverse stockinette – but I saw a version done in stockinette this week and it was so cute!  I’m going to use a linen blend, hopefully to cut down on the harshness of linen.  And as for all the short sleeved (or 3/4) cardis – well, I actually own quite a few, and I wear them for about half the year.  In fact, until I started knitting you would have been hard pressed to find any long sleeves ones in my closet, but that’s more due to my crazy long arms than anything else… although it must be said that I’m not very good at dressing for the weather (layering? what’s that?)

The Knitty Surprises are also up, and I really love Pam Allen’s Modern lace sweater.

I think the collar is very unique.  The whole sweater reminds me of some of the vintage 1940s patterns that I own.  It uses Classic elite 150, a yarn which I actually have in sufficient quantities in my stash, but mine is green – not what I have in mind here.  I have a dark spruce color of Reynolds Whiskey that might look nice.

Yarns I’m interested in trying for spring: all of the Valley Yarns cotton yarns – I had some longmeadow, but I hated the color so I sold it.  Yarns that are cotton/wool blends, like my favorite yarn cotton fleece – there are lots more of those than I realized, such as O-wool balance, Mirasol Cotanani, Classic Elite 4 seasons, and Rowan Wool cotton.  Look for swatches in the coming months!   I’m even thinking of giving Knit Picks Mainline another chance, as I hear rumors that they may actually be getting some new colors.  Maybe now I will like it better?  It could work for the 5th of the interweave sweaters.  I just hope they get more colors of Shine Sport (but why did they discontinue Aquamarine?  I have 10 balls of it, but every time I get ready to use it I realize I need 11!)

Will I get to all of these sweaters?  Of course not!  A new Interweave to me is like a Sears Christmas Wishbook in the hands of me at age 5 – but now, as then, the dreaming is half the fun.

Now I must be off to the grocery to plan dinner.  You may have noticed (or not) but I almost exclusively cook soups and pastas.  I rarely eat meat and I certainly don’t cook it (except sausage… sausage I can handle cooking) so I’m a big fan of the one dish meal.  But I do love to cook, and Thursday and Friday are the only days I’m home in time to make dinner!

On Crocheted sweaters, swatch of the week, and an award!

I had a post earlier, but accidentally deleted it… ah well, I will try again!

In my short crafting life I have made three crocheted sweaters… ok, three crocheted shrugs/boleros.  They were all made pre blog, and every one of them was a bit of a fiasco, considering that I didn’t want to swatch for fear I wouldn’t have gauge (better to make an entire sweater too small, yes?) and considering that I had no clue about sweater construction, so I had difficulty following the directions.  I also had no good idea how to sub yarns, resulting in one made of simply soft, one of Patons Brilliant, and one of some no-name Bernat baby yarn in an awful lavender.

Since then I have knit a lot of sweaters, but my tally of successful crocheted sweaters remains at zero.  I’m determined to change that, and I have moved these two sweaters (all from the Crochet Me book) up in my queue.

The first sweater will be first.  It calls for Blue Sky alpaca silk, which I am totally allergic to (unfortunately, because it is a gorgeous yarn!) so I’m subbing some Baby Cashmerino, which I may or may not have bought 2 colors of from Little Knits this week, where it is on sale for half price.  I don’t care for the other cashmerino yarns (hello pills!) but I think baby cashmerino is a great yarn.  The tank is crocheted in SWTC Bamboo, which could be nice, and the smallest size only calls for 3 balls.  It’s in tunisian crochet, which I’ve never done, but I love a challenge!

Other crocheted sweaters that now live in my ravelry queue…

Joy (gee, way to reuse names) from Rowan 41.  I got a great deal on some Rowan 4-ply cotton in Aegean from the ravelry destash board.  I’m not in love with many of Rowan’s colors (too muddy) but I love this one!

Sanctuary Bolero, from the new book Sensual Crochet.  I’m hoping to sub some Silky Wool in a nearly identical color (yay for stashbusting!) I know I haven’t gotten around to reviewing it yet, but take my word – this book is fab, with only a few missteps.  Below are some other sweaters from the book in my queue.

 

And finally, today’s swatching adventure.  This is Bernat Soy in the color Celery, swatching at 4 sc/in on a size H hook.  In the knitted swatch below I am getting 5 st/in.  This is a really nice yarn with a soft, silky feel.  It’s 50% soy, 50% acrylic.  I would compare it most to the feel of the many cotton/tencel blends on the market, such as Knitpicks shine and Cascade Pima tencel.  The color palette is currently limited to pastels and neutrals, but they are lovely colors – clear and without the muddiness I find in, for instance, the Rowan pastels.  I was actually at the store searching for some Cotton Ease, but I was forced to remember that I hate the dreadful chalky colors it comes in now.  Fortunately, the pain was mitigated by finding this lovely yarn on sale!

I was swatching for Short and Sweet from The Happy Hooker,  but I’m not sure this yarn is appropriate.  I have made this sweater once before – it is one of the failed sweaters I mentioned above.  I used Caron Simply soft, which fuzzed up horribly and just was not crisp enough for the sweater.  This yarn is very drapey, and I feel it would be more appropriate for something knitted.   But I’m not sure… I do really like this yarn, and I love the color.  I think it will make a nice fitted camisole – I will have to keep my eye out for a pattern!

Finally, Laura at Cosmicpluto knits has chosen me for this:

“Give the award to 10 people whose blogs bring you happiness and inspiration and make you feel happy about blogland. Let them know by posting a comment on their blog so they can pass it on. Beware you may get the award several times.”

I am so honored – she designed one of my favorite sweaters (Thermal) and I always love reading her blog!

I read so many great blogs (my bloglines go on forever!) that it’s hard to choose, but here are 10 in no particular order.

1. Feather and Fan

2. Yarn Crawl

3. Yarnhog

4. Much Adored

5. Musta Villa

6. Octopus Knits

7. Knitting RN

8. Knitting School Dropout

9. Crimson Purl

10.  Superstarra-ville

There are so many others I love – I had to leave so many great blogs out – yarny bloggers are amazing!  And if you haven’t been to any of these sites, check them out – tell them I sent you!

FO: My first (finished) doily, and some new WIPs

Pattern: Round Doily, from Japanese Crocheted lace (Kyuuto series, english translation.)

Thread: DMC Cebelia size 10, about 1/4-1/3 ball

Hook: 1.5 mm from the Hamanaka set (bought from Saucy Louise.)

Notes: A finished doily – yay! This was so much fun to make that I couldn’t put it down. There is something very soothing about crocheting in endless circles. This was my first charted crochet pattern, and I think I did pretty well – certainly it was easier for me to get through some of the stranger directions, although I did have some issues with how to start the last few rounds (it must have worked out, because I can’t tell.) The picot edge was annoying, as picots tend to be, but that’s ok… the nice effect is worth it. I love these hooks – they have a roundish grip that gives you something to hold onto without being obtrusive. The Clover soft touch hooks, which are similar, are more flat and tend to dig into my palm. I blocked this, sort of… at least I pinned it out, sprayed it with water, and then applied some spray starch. It isn’t absolutely even, but I don’t care about that. It looks so nice on the side table my dad refinished for me.

I will certainly be making more doilies in the future!

I have started two new projects to keep me busy. The first is the Diane Cardigan, from Louisa Hardings’ Knitting Little Luxuries.

I’m trying to make up a 32″ size, which shouldn’t be too hard. Impressions is a nice yarn – soft and very pretty when knitted up. After a few rows I got the hang of how to knit with it, and I haven’t been catching the thread it’s wrapped in. The most amazing thing to me is that I am using the recommended needle size – this hasn’t happened in at least a year! Maybe Ms. Harding is a fellow loose knitter?

I’ve started another crochet project as well.

This is Chanson en Crochet from Wrap Style, crocheted in Moda Dea Silk’n’wool. It’s very nice so far, although I can already see where some people have said the directions are vague. Will I wear a capelet? I sure hope so, but time will tell!

FO: Briar Rose Bolero

Pattern: Briar Rose Bolero by Ysolda

Yarn: Moda Dea Fashionista (tencel/acrylic) in Berry Red, 3.5 skeins

Size: 32-34 in (2nd smallest)

Needles: US 8

Notes: The key here, I think, is to just embrace the wideness of the bolero.  Keep everything else you’re wearing muted and close fitting.  Because seriously – no one is going to see anything but those shoulders.  I’ve changed my mind about this one, with reservations. Only time will tell if I can wear it out of the house without feeling like I’m wearing a Joan Crawford costume.  This is one of the few sweaters I have knit that provoked a spontaneous reaction from Marc -he loves the silhouette and the color.  I love the color too, which somehow manages to be a bright true red, while at the same time being a deep berry (seriously – it’s all dependent on the light.)  The color here is pretty true on my monitor,  and it is an unusual red.  I usually tend more towards the muted burgundies, so this is a departure for me.  Fortunately, I feel pretty confident in my ability to wear all but the orangest red.

I knit the pattern pretty much as written, with my only real mod being to knit the sleeves from the XS size, and to knit them a bit longer (I knit them to 13″.)  I used a 2×2 rib instead of the lacy edging, mostly because I felt like there was enough going on already, between the color and the shoulders, and I knit the border to 2″ instead of 4″, because I wanted to pull it tight in the front with a pin.  This pin doesn’t match, but it’s all I could find on such short notice – I do not like the jacket open, because the fronts fall back and make the shoulders look even more broad.

I quite enjoyed working with this yarn.  Part of the difficulty in photographing the sweater comes from the yarn’s velvety appearance, and the fact that it has a muted satin sheen that reflects the light.  It isn’t like any yarn I’ve used before at all – it felt sort of like knitting with the furry part of pipe cleaners, as strange of an analogy as that may be, although the sweater itself is not at all furry, just very soft.  There were a few times that I was irritated at the lack of elasticity, but it did not give me the wrist issues that working with pure acrylic does.  It probably wouldn’t have the greatest stitch definition in cables, and I wouldn’t use it for lace, but for straight stockinette I thought it was very nice.

I still don’t enjoy working in one piece very much.  The construction of this jacket is interesting, especially the shoulders, but I have to confess that half-way through I was wishing I could just seam it up!   I found the decrease section (after attaching the sleeves) a little confusing, but I got through everything ok, only ripping once.  This is not a beginner’s pattern – it uses short rows quite a bit, and some of the shoulder shaping is hard to grasp, although the pattern itself was pretty clear. I actually ended up with my stitch counts off in a few places, but I just fudged it and you can’t tell.

But I am not complaining.  In the end I think it suits my personal sense of style quite well, but you should keep in mind that I’m the person who used to wear business suits every day in high school.  I don’t really do casual very well.  And as we have established, I love the bolero!

WIP parade and a book review

I haven’t posted much this week, mostly because I have been feverishly knitting on Briar Rose.  There are two reasons why I will knit obsessively on something.  Either A: I love every stitch, and I can’t tear myself away or B: I am not enjoying something about this process so I want to hurry up and be done with the thing.  This, sadly, was reason B.  I have mixed emotions about this one.  I’ll talk more about it when I do the FO post, but here is a sneak peek!

Book Review: Kyuuto Lacy Crochet

This book is one of a series of Japanese books being translated into english.  There is also an amigurumi book, and an embroidery book will be published soon.  I was curious about what the translation would be like, so I added this book to my wishlist.  It isn’t my favorite of my Japanese books, but it does have some nice basic projects.  All the projects are small – doilies, coasters, a cute change purse, trays etc.  There are a few patterns that call for crocheting onto fabric, in order to make such items as a scissor case and a crochet hook holder.   Some of the projects have step by step directions, illustrated with photos.  If you’re wanting to understand charts better, I think this would be a helpful book.

The translation isn’t so great – I found some of the terms a little odd, and I wouldn’t recommend trying to follow any of the written directions except to double check the charts.  Hooks are listed in millimeters, which is fine, but threads are listed almost exclusively as “lace thread,” which is not really a helpful designation.  I think most of the projects I was looking at mean something like a size 10 thread.  It’s easy to tell by looking at the hook size recommended.  I’m planning to make the potholder shown above, but right now  I’m testing one of the basic patterns, a doily which has step by step instructions for parts of the pattern.  So far it’s going well – I’m using size 10 DMC Cebelia thread and a 1.5 mm hook (I am a loose crocheter as well as a loose knitter.)  I’m trying to use the chart as much as possible, and I really feel like I’m making good progress on my crochet chart reading!

FO: Transition Gloves

Pattern: Transition gloves from Shibuiknits

Yarn: Shibui sock in Mulberry and Peacock

Needles: US 1 and 0 DPNs

Notes: Before I started knitting I never would have considered wearing fingerless gloves.  Now I get it – the point is that you don’t have to make fingers – plus I can play in them (just nothing tremendously hard – church playing is fine.)  I love these gloves!  The colorwork was easy once I got started, and now I’m anxious to make even more fingerless gloves, despite the fact that one of my choir members asked me today why I was wearing socks on my arms.  I told him that we all have to suffer for fashion (or something like that.)  My only disappointment in these is the pooling on the hands, but I can live with it!  I knit the ribbing on size 0s and the colorwork on size 1s, much smaller than the pattern called for (I have teeny tiny wrists.)  They still turned out a little big in the wrist, but that’s ok.  I would highly recommend this pattern to someone just starting color work (like me) because it was easy to remember each row and the floats aren’t too long.  Now it’s on to more color work!

 

January Destash!

If you’ve been waiting for the felted tweed sale, this is it!

We will hopefully be moving pretty soon (well, if we find a house we like!) and I really don’t want to move all this stuff. So this is the destash where you get to see exactly the kind of stuff I have clogging up my (not that large) condo. Plus I need to get rid of all the alpaca yarns I had that were hiding under other names the last time I tried to get rid of things that irritate my allergies (I’m looking at you Elann!)

Prices are at least 25% off retail, many are more. Shipping isn’t included, but I will charge only actual shipping. I have a smoke free home, but I do have cats, so there may be the occasional cat hair, although I do try to keep them away from the yarn. I prefer payment by Paypal (any kind is ok.) I’m offering these yarns here first, and I will list any that are left on Ravelry later (I like to give my readers first crack at this sort of thing!) Please pay attention to the amounts listed, as they may vary from the amount shown in the photo! If you are interested, please leave a comment with what you are interested in and I will get back to you!

Be sure to check the list at the end of the post for lonely orphaned skeins of yarn that need a home (prices 50% off or more)as well as a great deal on all my simply soft yarn.

***Pending***

Yarn: 3 skeins Rowan 4-ply soft
Color: tea rose

Price: $19

Notes: New and unswatched – the color just isn’t great with my skintone!

**pending***
Yarn: 6 skeins Rowan Felted Tweed
Color: sigh

Price: $39

Notes: One ball has been swatched and frogged, the others are new. Sadly, I am allergic to this wonderful yarn!

***Pending***

Yarn: 8 skeins Rowan Felted Tweed
Color: Rage

Price: $52

Notes: One ball has been swatched and frogged, the others are new. Sadly, I am allergic to this wonderful yarn!

Yarn: 3 skeins Cascade 220 quattro (to the left in the photo above.)
Color: aruba

Price: $17

Notes: One ball has been wound into a centerpull ball, but I don’t believe it’s been knit with at all!

***Pending***

Yarn: 2 skeins Sweet Georgia Superwash sock
Color: Fondant

Price: $20

Notes: Unused. I love these colors, but I’m not sure I will get around to using this yarn!
 

***Pending***

Yarn: 2 skeins Mountain Colors Bearfoot sock yarn

Color: (from left) Flathead Cherry,  Huckleberry

Price: $15 each

Notes: Unused. I have a pair of socks made of bearfoot and they’re wonderful!

Yarn:Rowan Bamboo soft, 1.75 skeins

Price: $9

Notes: Swatched with one ball. The skeins look messy, but they were that way when I bought them!

***Pending***

Yarn: 10 skeins Elann Baby silk

Price: $20

Notes: I love the color of this yarn, but it has alpaca content!
Also Available: Pictures on Ravelry or you can ask. Most of these yarns are leftovers from projects I have made. I’m not likely to use them up, and I’d love for someone who will use them to have them (prices 50% off retail or more)

1 skein Misti alpaca lace in a dark navy, $3.501 skein Rowan summer tweed in loganberry – $4

1 skein Brown Sheep cotton fleece in terracotta (used for my Juliet sweater) $4

2 skeins Caron Simply Soft Shadows in a dark blue colorway. $41 skein Kathmandu Aran – The same colorway as my Central Park Hoodie, dark gray with purple flecks. $4