FO: A top for girly lumberjacks (Simplicity 2501)

Pattern: Simplicity 2501

Fabric: Green flannel cotton from Fabric.com (actually a quilting flannel I think)

Notions: Six 1/2″ green buttons, sew in interfacing, a set of 3/8″ shoulder pads

Notes: This is my new favorite photo of myself… see below for the shirt in living color!  I was attracted to this pattern because of the ties and the puffy sleeves.  I was looking to replicate a shirt I saw on Modcloth (see my last post for a photo of that) and thought this pattern looked like a good starting place.  It’s a pattern that has different pieces for B,C, and D cups – I used the B cup pieces.   There are several different styles, including pieces for long sleeves, 3/4 length ruched sleeves, and a bodice option with a peplum.

I opted to make view B, which had short puffy sleeves and a tie, but no peplum.  I don’t think the peplum would have worked well with the plaid, as the pieces were rather curved.  It took me forever to cut out the plaid so it would match up, but it was worth it!  I’m especially proud of the fronts.  It matches everywhere except the back sleeves.   I used sew-in lightweight interfacing.  I didn’t mention it, but I also used sew-in on the Beignet skirt, and I find that I prefer it to the fusibles.  I don’t think it takes any more time than it takes to fuse, and I find it less annoying and the results nicer.

I made quite a few alterations, in order to get the fit and look I wanted.  First I tried tissue fitting the bodice, which I found very helpful.  There’s a good video tutorial on Gertie’s blog, if you are interested.  I’ve ordered “Fit for real people” and I’m looking forward to reading it as well.I discovered that most of my shoulder width is in my back (which I knew) so I cut a size 8 on the back, and a 6 in the front.  I also took about an inch total out of the waist – I wanted a more fitted look than the pattern was designed for.  I drafted new pieces for the neckband and ties – the ones included were sort of dinky, and I wanted to be able to tie a bow.  I added 12″ in length to each end of the tie.  I sewed the sleeves in flat, which worked just fine.  After the shirt was finished I wasn’t quite satisfied with the look of the sleeves – the puffs were tending to be droopy.  I thought about it, and realized that the 1940s blouse silhouette that I love (which I was semi imitating) used shoulder pads… so I sewed in a pair of 3/8″ pads, and the look instantly improved.  I would definitely recommend this pattern, and I plan to make another in a more traditional fabric (with longer sleeves.)

I am so pleased at how this came out – it matches the image I had it my head, and how often does that happen?  I learned a lot about fitting on this one, and made alterations that gave me the fit I wanted.  It was relatively straightforward, and the directions in the pattern were fine (It did jump around a bit, but since I did things in a different order it didn’t really matter.)

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30 thoughts on “FO: A top for girly lumberjacks (Simplicity 2501)

  1. Melissa says:

    Amazing! I found your blog because I’m a knitter, but I love your new hobby. Well done on the shirt. I can’t wait to see what’s next.

  2. You did a superb job on this shirt. Good idea on mixing and matching the pieces to create such a excellent custom fit.

    I’m partial to plaid and green anyways.

  3. You’re really doing great with your sewing. I agree, the top looks fantastic on you. So, you knit wonderfully and now you’re sewing the same- you should be very proud of yourself. I can’t wait to see more! Jennifer

  4. Christina says:

    So cute! I have to say you’re really talented in your craftiness, everything you do seems to come out perfect or close to it. And you’ve got a bit of Katharine Hepburn thing going on in these pics – awesome!

  5. I’m going to be absolutely frank with you. I’m so totally jealous! I can’t tell you how many times I’ve sewn blouses that I was too embarrassed to wear in public…and here you’ve created one IN PLAID that’s absolutely perfect. You’re amazing :)

  6. Eva says:

    I love the shirt! the color is amazing, and the fit is so perfect! I tried sewing, and made a quilt, but anything more than straight lines… forget it… I ended up quitting sewing… I think I was too afraid of the machine…

  7. Beautiful work! The shirt looks lovely on you. Plaid matches beautifully. I think it’s more important that the plaid/pattern matches in the front than in the back.

    Great design changes and pattern alterations. Well done! ;)

  8. That turned out so well! You really belong in the 1940’s. My mom (born in 1940) was a movie-star beautiful redhead. I have some pictures of her from the 1950s that really remind me of you (or vice versa, I suppose).

    I think you inspired me to try to overcome my fear of my sewing machine. While I was buying some fabric online today to re-cover my patio furniture cushions, I came across some clearance fabric that I really liked and thought, “Hey, I’ll bet I could make a skirt out of that!” I was thinking about your new yellow skirt–not for the style, which wouldn’t suit me, but because you did it. So I ordered the fabric. I found a simple pattern online today. Once the fabric arrives, I’ll be breaking out the machine. Of course, if I really do sew my fingers together, I’m totally blaming you!

  9. Jill says:

    Loved how happy you look. The plaids are great. Isn’t it amazing how even expensive clothing has mismatched plaids? Anyway, a sewing hint on plaids is that you did the sleeves perfectly. Only on a rare exception will plaids match both the front and back – due to ease, gathering, tucks etc. So a well tailored plaid will have the fronts match – this is what people look at the most. Same with the side plaids – you can not get them to match above and below a dart – so match the sides below the dart where it shows the most. GOOD JOB>

  10. Stop it! You’re going to drive me back to sewing. Here I am, commenting on you gorgeous shirt. What a great job you did, and I agree, the black and white photo really captures it.

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